Wednesday, October 22, 2008

Cranberry harvest-time



I passed one of our neighborhood cranberry bogs a couple of days ago and saw that it was flooded and the harvesting was under way. Bogs grow cranberries on low bushes during the warm months, and then about this time of year the bogs are flooded and the ripe berries break free of the plants and float to the surface. It's a bit of a round-up, as men and women wade across the bog in thigh-deep water and the berries are corralled at one end and sucked up into a truck.
It creates one of those lovely, seasonal Cape Cod images. So much of our area has been developed in housing that it's refreshing and reassuring to see that some land is still producing cranberries. Massachusetts used to be the cranberry-producing champion of the nation, but I think that Wisconsin long ago took over that crown. Still, there are plenty of Cape Cod and nearby bogs that supply berries for your Thanksgiving table.
This bog is about a mile-and-a-half from our house, at the intersection of Thomas Landers Road and Hatchville Road.

4 comments:

Dan Finnegan said...

I hope that you'll show me a bog one day; the photos are beautiful. I'm still getting over the firing. The wood chamber was dreadful - oxidized and pasty in spite of great heat. Trying a refire in town to see what happens?! Great things in the salt, but why dwell on that?

Hollis Engley said...

Strange how that happens, isn't it? The flame path, maybe? Refire can't hurt and might help. And I do think it's worth dwelling on the successes ...

doug fitch said...

That's really interesting, I never knew that's how it's done - beautiful pics too.

Hollis Engley said...

Thanks, Doug. All the English countryside photos in your blog and others have inspired me to go out and document the Cape between pots.