Sunday, January 10, 2010

First new pots of 2010, out this morning





I think I may have enough small Shino bowls on hand now, after another 30 or so came out of the kiln this morning. I fired yesterday, lighting up at 8:30 a.m. and shutting down six hours later. Lots of brown stoneware bowls, summer teabowl size, mostly in multi-layer Shinos and ash glazes. There's a photo of some of them at the top.
I've been doing a lot of these bowls in the past few months. They take to the glazing so well and I make them quickly, plus people seem to buy them, which is a little extra bonus. It's always good to sell pots.
Dee and I unloaded the kiln, and later our friends Jo Ann Muramoto and Lafe Coppola showed up to see the new pots. And each found a couple to take home. Jo Ann was looking for mugs, and found two. Lafe is always looking for pots of one kind or another for his new house in W. Falmouth, and he took home a small Shino cereal bowl and a teabowl. Other good things came out of the kiln, too, including a nice Shino/ash jar, seen here with Dee peering over it. And Alli Connolly, my student intern, got a very nice tall two-piece vase, which will probably be exhibited in the student show this spring at the Cape Cod Museum of Art.
A good firing. Now, on to make more pots.

17 comments:

brandon phillips said...

you fired in 6 hours? i tell folks that i fire that fast and they all say that i'm crazy. the results speak for themselves, nice shinos!

ang said...

aww lovely shino pots and great that your friends come out to buy them so quickly..wish i could fire in six!

Ron said...

Nice pots Hollis! Six hours is my kind of firing. What's the size of that kiln?

Hollis Engley said...

The standard firing for this kiln is about 6 to 7 hours. Cold to cone 10.5 or thereabouts. It's not a big kiln - 17 cu.ft. Olympic downdraft, fueled with natural gas. I rarely go over 1.5 pounds of gas pressure. I know Tracey Broome has had some problems dealing with Olympic lately, and I found early on that they were not much help in straightening out a serious firing problem I had, but I do like the kiln. If you have seen an ad in Ceramics Monthly for the Geil kiln, it's pretty much the same thing. Six burners, three to a side. Steel frame, ceramic fiber walls, brick floor. As long as I'm turning out good pots, so does the kiln.

Amy said...

wow.. that is quick! Shinos are my favorites these days, especially spotted shino with a bit of soda ash sprinkled on... Great colors!

Trish said...

Beautiful bowls.. I love the earthy colours that are produced.
Good start to 2010! :)
Trish from Alberta

mengley said...

Love that vase mom's holding -- good stuff.

Hollis Engley said...

Thanks, Trish. I guess "Earthy" is what I do. And yes, Marco, that's a nice jar your mom's got there.

Elizabeth Seaver said...

A gorgeous harvest!

Winston said...

Thanks for the blog and pictures, Hollis. As a beginner potter, I am always interested to learn new things and I didn't know that you could actually throw ash on glaze to get a different effect. Here in Penang, we have tried an ash glaze made with rubber tree wood that is very unpredictable (the ash, I mean) and we get a variety of colours from pale blonde to a reddish orange. Next time I do glazing, I am certainly going to try adding ash to my glaze.

HENHOUSE POTTERY said...

Beautiful bowls! The shinos turned out just lovely.

Dirt-Kicker Pottery said...

It looks like 2010 is going to be a great year for pots at Hatchville POttery!

Hollis Engley said...

Thanks, all. Winston, I use an ash glaze, which is ash and several other components. But I also sprinkle dry ash on top of the wet Shino just after I've dipped it or poured it. If you see sprinkles of gray on top of some of the bowls, that's the dry ash melted into the glaze. And I should tell you that rubber tree ash is very difficult to find on Cape Cod.

Linda Starr said...

Beautiful bowls; what a great way to save fuel dollars firing that fast.

traceybroome@mindspring.com said...

Well, I don't even have to say it, you know I am loving these pots! Is that a new mug shape for you? I'm not sure I have seen that one before. Susan Filley has a Geil kiln like the one you mentioned and she fires it really fast too. I'm like you, hate the service from Olympic but I really like my kiln.

Hollis Engley said...

Hi, Tracey. My mug shapes change with the moon, I think. I do a bunch of different things. This is a shape I've been doing the past couple of months. It's a variation of one I was doing last summer, which was a change from ... etc. Keep firing that kiln.

jimgottuso said...

beautiful bunch of bowls there hollis